Donald Trump has succeeded in doing what almost no one thought he could: he has for all intents and purposes secured the position of Republican nominee for his own. This has not been a quiet revolution: almost everyone in the Republican party quickly decided that President Donald Trump was not something they wanted, and most of the party fought to try and stop him from securing the nomination. Two former Republican presidents have spoken against him, and the current Speaker of the House Paul Ryan has stated that he does not yet support Trump as president.

Trump has appealed to a brand of Conservatives that few have ever tried to directly target before: the Conservatives that are in favor of a more Nationalistic United States. It is still too early to say what the effects of a highly Nationalistic US would be like, but many like the idea of more protection for the country and fewer efforts focused abroad.

Paul Ryan

Paul Ryan

Because Trump is a businessman, he understood his “customers” (Republican voters) better than anyone else in the party did. The Republican Party liked an outsider better than one of the traditional politicians that the party usually puts out; this has created a divide between “traditional” and “anti-establishment” Republicans that is not likely to get any better any time soon.

Category: Trump 2.0